Events

We organise events that explore facets of multilingualism in Sydney (and beyond). 

Multilingual Sydney:

New people, new city

The Macquarie Multilingualism Research Group, Macquarie University

NSW State Library (Metcalfe Auditorium)

Dec 15, 2018 (10 am - 12 pm)

Migrants and their languages are the lifeblood of successful global cities. This is as true of Sydney as it is of many other multilingual cities around the world. To coincide with the publication of their book, Multilingual Sydney, an expert panel will address two questions. What is the value of languages in a multicultural city? How can we nurture our language heritage for the future prosperity of the city? 

The program will include short presentations by members of an expert panel, followed by Q&A. Speakers include Dr Alice Chik on Multilingual Sydney (Macquarie University), Dr Peter Roger on health (Macquarie University), Prof Nick Parr on management (Macquarie University), Dr Robyn Moloney on language education (Macquarie University), Prof Phil Benson (Macquarie University) & Dr Emi Otsuji (University of Technology Sydney) on languages on the street, and representatives from NSW Federation of Community Language Schools Inc. and Ethnic Community Services Co-operative. The panel will be joined by Prof Rauno Parrila (Macquarie University) to discuss the new urban diversities of multilingual Sydney.

Learning about Language: Preparing Pre-Service Subject Teachers for Multilingual Classroom Realities
Dr Tobias Schroedler
Hamburg University

This talk describes and discusses experiences gained in a German teacher education innovation project on competence and skill development in dealing with multilingualism. New seminar structures were developed, which go hand in hand with a reorganisation to the entire teacher education structure in the University of Hamburg. The aim of these reform implementations is to equip all future subject teachers with relevant skills for dealing with multilingualism and GSL learners' challenges. In order to achieve this, in the M.Ed. programme (Teacher Degree) students learn about linguistic diversity, basics of contrastive theoretical linguistics, language development, strategies and methods for language-sensitive subject teaching as well as practical implementation guidance. For a better understanding of the competence development and the effectiveness of our new seminar(s), we employ a thoroughly validated test instrument in a pre-post design to observe the participants' skill development. The results of this testing procedure show positive tendencies, yet it remains clear that more work needs to be done in the area.

Date: Oct 23, 2018 (1 - 2 pm)

Macquarie University 29 Wally's Walk Rm 292

Multilingual literacy practices

The workshop is based on the research and findings of the European Erasmus+ project KOINOS which aims at developing competencies as well as raising awareness with regard to social diversity for the benefit social cohesion in the classroom and beyond. Participants will be provided with pedagogical materials concepts that allow the implementation of the concept into the curriculum.

Presenter: Christian Helmchen (Hamburg University)

Date: May 17, 2018 (4 - 6pm)

Venue: Macquarie University

29 Wally's Walk, Rm 292

Free event. This is a NESA registered PD event. 

Registration

Pluralistic Approaches to Languages and Culture

Christian Helmchen, Hamburg University

The concept of 'Pluralistic Approaches to Languages and Cultures' refers to multilingual teaching and learning methods that involve multiple languages or linguistic varieties and / or cultures as well as an overarching concept of competence. Its components are mostly useful not only for learning a single particular language, but for learning different languages.

Date: May 15, 2018 (1 - 2 pm)

Venue: Macquarie University, 29 Wally's Walk

Rm 292

Inquiry: multilingualsydney@gmail.com

Mapping suburban multilingualism in Sydney

During his study leave in the United Kingdom in March and April 2018, Phil Benson presented research on ‘Mapping suburban multilingualism in Sydney’ at the TLANG Communication in the Multilingual City conference at Birmingham University and for the Westminster Forum on Language and Linguistics. His paper discusses three approaches to understanding multilingualism in the suburb of Eastwood – analysis of census data, photographing the linguistic landscape, and participant observation in multicultural events. It shows how each approach reveals the suburb as a different kind of space – residential, commercial, and an imagined space of multiculturalism - problematizing the identification of the suburb with its geographical boundaries. During his study leave Phil was hosted by Prof. Terry Lamb at the University of Westminster and also enjoyed a productive visit to the Multilingual Manchester research centre at the University of Manchester.

Pluralistic Approaches to Languages and Culture

Christian Helmchen, Hamburg University

The concept of 'Pluralistic Approaches to Languages and Cultures' refers to multilingual teaching and learning methods that involve multiple languages or linguistic varieties and / or cultures as well as an overarching concept of competence. Its components are mostly useful not only for learning a single particular language, but for learning different languages.

Date: May 15, 2018 (1 - 2 pm)

Venue: Macquarie University, 29 Wally's Walk

Rm 292

Inquiry: multilingualsydney@gmail.com

NSW Federation of Community Language Schools annual conference

We had an amazing time at the NSW Federation of Community Language Schools annual conference on Oct 7. More than 600 community language teachers attended the event. John Hajek (University of Melbourne) used clips from I Love Lucy to demonstrate the importance of humour in language learning. When everyone laughed, we all got the power of humour for language learning. Ken Cruickshank (University of Sydney) gave statistics on community language teachers and students to show the contributions of these voluntary teachers, and how much more needs to be done to promote and sustain the linguistic diversity of NSW. 

 

Another fantastic feature of the annual conference is the number of languages being spoken at the venue. The whole place was buzzing with sounds, colours and gestures. 

 

Macquarie University had a team of four who gave featured workshops on the day, and the presentations fully displayed the complexity of urban multilingualism. 

 

Alice Chik (Educational Studies) used the activity 'What's in your bag?' to integrate community language reading and writing to everyday digital practices. Emojis seem to be the common language used in that workshop!

 

Scott Smith (Educational Studies) surprised his audience with his Mandarin Chinese in the presentation, 'Teacher Beliefs and Reflection'. Scott used research findings from his doctoral study to help Chinese teachers understand the connection between teacher beliefs and teaching practices. 

 

Mayumi Kashiwa (Linguistics) showed teachers how to help students to create good learning environments for both in-class and out-of-class learning. The use of creative mind mapping helped teachers to visualise language learning as more than events that happen only in the Saturday classrooms!

 

Shiva Motaghi-Tabari gave teachers something to think about: the importance of bilingual parenting on children's language learning. Teachers welcomed research-supported evidence to encourage parents to be proud of their home language use. 

 

 If you missed the event, come join us in 2018! 

NSW Federation of Community Languages School

The Australian census: Opportunities for research on multilingualism

Why do we need census data? And what can we do with them? 

The Macquarie Multilingualism Research Group will hold a workshop to discuss the potential for research on multilingualism incorporating new data from the Australian 2016 Census. Associate Professor Jim Forrest (Geography and Planning) and Professor Phil Benson (Linguistics) will outline how census data has been used in previous research on multilingualism, in Australia and internationally, and discuss their own collaborative work on patterns of multilingualism in Sydney and intergenerational language shift in Australia. Timed to follow the first release of data from the 2016 Census in late June 2017, the workshop will be a timely opportunity to discuss the roles of census data in ongoing multilingualism research.

Forrest's 'Suburbs "swamped" by Asians and Muslims? The data show a different story. The Conversation 

Benson's powerpoint presentation

https://padlet.com/alice_chik/ylkgrwt8mpz 

25 July 2017 (11am - 1pm)

Macquarie University

Australian Hearing Hub (S2.6)

Room 1.64

North Ryde, NSW2109

Registration

Migration, study abroad and language learning beyond the classroom: Research agendas and approaches

A two-day workshop organized by the Macquarie University Mulitilingualism and Applied Linguistics Research Groups

This two-day workshop explored areas of synergy, potential research agendas, and approaches to research on migration, study abroad and language learning beyond the classroom. Day one focused on key issues and agendas emerging from our current and recent research. Day two focused on research methodologies, what they can tell us, and how they might be combined in future research in these areas.

 

In addition to Macquarie researchers, Prof. Jane Jackson (Chinese University of Hong Kong) and Prof. Gary Barkhuizen (University of Auckland) participated in the workshops.

24-25 January 2017

C5A 558

Multilingual Sydney: Human Sciences Perspectives on New Urban Diversities

Cutting edge research on city-based multilingualism.

As a consequence of changing patterns of 21st century settlement, Sydney has become the most diverse and intensely multilingual city in Australia. The 2011 Census revealed that more than 35% of the Greater Sydney population speaks two or more languages at home compared to the national figure of 20%, and Asian languages now mingle with the European languages of 20th century migration to create a rich urban tapestry of culturally and linguistically diverse neighbourhoods. The 2016 Census is likely to show an increase in the number of multilingual residents and the diversity of languages spoken across the city, opening up new contexts and issues for multidisciplinary research.

The workshop showcases cutting edge research on city-based multilingualism and featured keynote presentations by Dr Lid King (The Languages Company, UK), Professor Joseph Lo Bianco (Melbourne University), Associate Professor Kathleen Heugh (University of South Australian), Dr Emi Otsuji and Professor Alastair Pennycook (University of Technology Sydney).

Multilingual Sydney Workshop [YouTube playlist]

15 November, 2016 (8am - 6:30pm)

Australian Hearing Hub

© 2019 by Multilingual Sydney

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